Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus 15/2-3



1. Editorial Foreword
James Crossley and Anthony Le Donne.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 167 - 168, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502001

2. Q in Matthew: A Review Essay
Sarah E. Rollens.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 169 - 191, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502002

3. Matthew as Performer, Tradent, Scribe
Rafael Rodríguez.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 192 - 212, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502003

4. Matthew as Scribal Tradent: An Assessment of Alan Kirk’s Q in Matthew
Robert A. Derrenbacker.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 213 - 223, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502004

5. Q, Memory and Matthew: A Response to Alan Kirk
Mark Goodacre.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 224 - 233, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502005

6. The Synoptic Problem, Ancient Media, and the Historical Jesus
Alan Kirk.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 234 - 259, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502006

7. Richard Wagner’s Prose Sketches for Jesus of Nazareth
Richard H. Bell.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 260 - 290, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502007

8. What’s Good for the Goose is Good for the Gander
Benjamin C.F. Shaw.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 291 - 309, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502008

9. On Richard Carrier’s Doubts
Daniel N. Gullotta.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 310 - 346, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502009

10. Hypertextuality and Historicity in the Gospels, written by Adamczewski, Bartosz
Boris Paschke.
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 347 - 349, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502010

11. Contents
Volume 15, Issue 2-3, pages 351 - 352, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455197-01502011

New Testament Studies 64/1






Jason A. Staples
New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp 1 - 19
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000273 Published Online on

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Marie de Lovinfosse
New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp 20 - 32
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000224 Published Online on

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Michael P. Theophilos
New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp 33 - 43
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000285 Published Online on

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Torsten Jantsch
New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp 44 - 63
doi: 10.1017/S002868851700025X Published Online on

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Logan Williams
New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp 64 - 80
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000170 Published Online on

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Matthijs den Dulk
New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp 81 - 93
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000236 Published Online on

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Daniel Lanzinger
New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp 94 - 107
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000261 Published Online on

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Benjamin A. Edsall
New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp 108 - 121
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000248 Published Online on

Front Cover (OFC, IFC) and matter



New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp f1 - f2
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000297 Published Online on

Back Cover (IBC, OBC) and matter



New Testament Studies, Volume 64 / Issue 1, December 2017, pp b1 - b4
doi: 10.1017/S0028688517000303 Published Online on


Monday, December 4, 2017

Journal of Hebrew Scriptures



Articles

Abstract :
Distinguishing terminologically and conceptually between polysemy, polyvalence, and double coding, this essay outlines a framework for treating instances of discursive polysemy in the Hebrew Bible. Particular attention is given to the Song of Songs, the polysemous nature of which is demonstrated through discussions of Song 5:2-6 and 5:7.

Abstract :
In God in the Dock, Carleen Mandolfo argues that the move from second person speech to God to third person description of the divine within "dialogic psalms" reflects the "interjection" of a secondary voice. While her focus on speech to a human audience is significant, the criteria she employs prove problematic. Rather than multiple voices, the psalms Mandolfo discusses are better understood as reflecting shifts in address between multiple audiences spoken by a single supplicant.

 

Reviews

Chapman, Stephen B., 1 Samuel as Christian Scripture: A Theological Commentary (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016). (Reviewed by Joel Barker)

Crouch, C. L., An Introduction to the Study of Jeremiah (London/New York: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 2017). (Reviewed by Lissa M. Wray Beal)

Cudworth, Troy D., War in Chronicles: Temple Faithfulness and Israel's Place in the Land (LHBOTS, 627; London: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 2016). (Reviewed by Suk-il Ahn)

Gibson, Jonathan, Covenant Continuity and Fidelity: A Study of Inner-Biblical Allusion and Exegesis in Malachi (LHBOTS, 625; London: Bloomsbury, 2016). (Reviewed by Michael H. Floyd)

Lipschits, Oded and Aren M. Maeir (eds.), The Shephelah in the Iron Age (Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2017). (Reviewed by Andrew Walton)

Niditch, Susan, The Responsive Self: Personal Religion in Biblical Literature of the Neo-Babylonian and Persian Periods (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015). (Reviewed by Daniel O. McClellan)

Peterson, Brian N. The Authors of the Deuteronomistic History: Locating a Tradition in Ancient Israel (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2014). (Reviewed by Raleigh C. Heth)

Smith-Christopher, Daniel, Micah: A Commentary (OTL; Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2015). (Reviewed by Joshua Gardner)

Tiemeyer, Lena-Sofia, Zechariah's Vision Report and Its Earliest Interpreters: A Redaction-Critical Study of Zechariah 1–8 (LHBOTS, 626; London: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 2016). (Reviewed by Michael R. Stead)

 Wright, Archie T., The Origin of Evil Spirits: The Reception of Genesis 6:1–4 in Early Jewish Literature (rev. ed.; Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2015). (Reviewed by Reed Carlson )

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Aramaic Studies 15/2


1. Special Issue: Syriac Medicine

1. Syriac Medicine: Introduction
Matteo Martelli.
Volume 15, Issue 2, pages 125 - 131, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455227-01502006

2. Galen in Syriac: Rethinking Old Assumptions
Siam Bhayro.
Volume 15, Issue 2, pages 132 - 154, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455227-01502003

3. Transliteration versus Translation of Greek Plant Names in the Syriac Medical Writings of Sergius of Reš ʿAynā: On the Tables of Contents in BL Add. 14,661
Irene Calà and Robert Hawley.
Volume 15, Issue 2, pages 155 - 182, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455227-01502004

4. Comparing Interpretative Notes in the Syriac and Arabic Translations of the Hippocratic Aphorisms
Taro Mimura.
Volume 15, Issue 2, pages 183 - 199, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455227-01502005

5. A Hitherto Unknown Medical Fragment in Syriac. Evidence of Recipes and Prescriptions from the Qubbet el-Ḫazne of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus
Emiliano Fiori.
Volume 15, Issue 2, pages 200 - 229, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455227-001

6. Hippocrates in Two Syriac Alchemical Collections
Matteo Martelli.
Volume 15, Issue 2, pages 230 - 251, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455227-01502002

7. On the Medical Works of Barhebraeus: With a Description of the Abridgement of Ḥunain’s Medical Questions
Hidemi Takahashi and Naohide Yaguchi.
Volume 15, Issue 2, pages 252 - 276, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/17455227-01501005


Biblical Interpretation 25/4-5


1. The Futures of Biblical Studies

1. Introduction: Futures, Presents and Gestures of Supersession: The Futures of Biblical Studies at the University of Kent

Yvonne Sherwood.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 435 - 439, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P01

2. A Voyage round My Library

David J.A. Clines.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 440 - 477, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P02

3. Back to the Future: Reading the Abraham Narratives as Prequel

Megan Warner.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 479 - 496, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P03

4. The Future of Biblical Israel: How Should Christians Read Romans 9-11 Today?

Susannah Ticciati.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 497 - 518, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P04

5. Grammars of Sacrifice: Futures, Subjunctives, and What Would Have/Could Have Happened on Mount Moriah?

Yvonne Sherwood.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 519 - 554, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P05

6. Biblical Blood-Lines: From Foundational Corpus to the Far Right Bible

Hannah Strømmen.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 555 - 573, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P06

7. The Exile, the Nomad, and the Ghostly: Holocaust Memory and Identities of the Biblical at the Edge of Reception Studies

David Tollerton.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 574 - 590, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P07

8. Paul and Political Critique: Liberalism, Ontology, and the Pauline Community

Taylor Weaver.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 591 - 608, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P08

9. Ritual and the Agency of Food in Ancient Israel and Judah: Food Futures in Biblical Studies

Rebekah Welton.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 609 - 624, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P09

10. Mute and Mutilated: Understanding Judges 19-21 as a משל of Dialogue

Jennifer M. Matheny.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 625 - 646, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P10

11. Cognitive Perspectives on Early Christology

Daniel McClellan.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 647 - 662, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P11

12. The Impe(/a)rative of Dialogue in Asian Hermeneutics within the Modern/Colonial World System: Renegotiating Biblical Pasts for Planetary Futures

Stephen Chin Ming Lim.
Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 663 - 678, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P12

13. Contents to Volume 25 (2017)

Volume 25, Issue 4-5, pages 679 - 682, 2017
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685152-02545P13